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devil duck

Whoa. That was weird.

So I follow a link in somebody's LJ post to a Washington Post blog entry. And over on the right side of the page is a panel labeled "Your Friends' Activity", listing Washington Post pages that have been liked, linked to, etc. by a bunch of people I know. How does the Washington Post know this? And which of my various social-network identities is it using to figure out whom I "know"? I mouse-over some of the entries, and they show Facebook URL's. Wait: I don't even have a Facebook account (that I know of)! Oh, I bet shalmestere didn't log out of her Facebook account the last time she used this computer. Still, a bit scary. I guess this is the "frictionless sharing" thing they were talking about.
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http://sharemenot.cs.washington.edu/ is a good extension to use there.
The annoying thing is that she may well have logged out of her Facebook account. Evidently Facebook sets cookies that track what you're doing whether you're logged in or not. Various people I know keep a separate web browser just for Facebook in order to quarantine the infection.
That works for regular cookies, but not flash cookies which cross browsers. I don't know that FB uses those, but many many sites do.
I think I found a way to stop that nonsense, but of course I don't remember how. I think it was a button I clicked on Yahoo News. In any case, I still see what friends have viewed, but it stopped FB from showing what I have viewed.
May I hand a link to this entire entry-plus-comments around? There are people who keep urging me to join FaceBook in connection with the e-zine I edit, and I keep hearing about stuff like this, which only stiffens my resolve NOT to.
Sure, it's public.
Even if she is logged out, there are locally stored objects that can keep information around.
I'm using noscript and betterprivacy with firefox and am much happier for it.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/08/how_to_stay_anonymous_part_ii/