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devil duck

garden pests

Last fall I posted this about our quince trees (which have just come into bloom in the past three days -- yay!)

Update: from the Web research I've done so far, this is probably two separate infections: a primary attack by the Oriental fruit moth (the closely-related codling moth would have gone straight for the seeds, rather than honeycombing the flesh), followed by an opportunistic brown-rot infection.

Oriental fruit moths overwinter, and then go through three or four generations in a summer: the first generation eats leaf shoots, leaving them wilted (which we did see last year), while later generations eat fruit. There are a variety of control mechanisms: parasitic wasps (Glabridorsum, Trichogramma, Macrocentrus); pheromones that disrupt the breeding cycle; a new virus brand-named Madex HP; bacteria-based pesticides Dipel (Bt) and Success (Spinosad); chemical insecticides methoxyfenozide, chlorantraniliprole, and flubendianide. I'm calling local garden stores to see what they've got that makes sense on my scale, for an orchard of two (2) trees.
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The University of California IPM site (http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r602300211.html) recommends mating disruptants (CheckMate, IsoMate) as the preferred strategy; parasitic wasps (e.g. Macrocentrus ancylivorus) are also good, if you can keep other pesticides from killing them.

The Penn State IPM site (http://extension.psu.edu/plants/tree-fruit/insects-mites/oriental-fruit-moth) mentions mating disruptants (CideTrak, Disrupt), but says they work best on orchards of at least 5-10 acres.